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Skip to 0 minutes and 8 secondsI think that this way of thinking about mental health has some quite profound consequences. If you realise the way in which a person thinks about the world, the way in which a person responds to events in their lives, makes a difference to their mental health, to their well being, to anxiety and depression, it does change the way in which we should approach mental health problems. Of course, it's important to remember that most psychologists believe that the ways in which people respond to the world are themselves learned through experience. So if I respond to negative events in my life by ruminating and by blaming myself, there will be a reason why I'm doing that.

Skip to 0 minutes and 52 secondsBut this way of thinking has some significant consequences for how we care for people and understand people who have profound mental health problems. It brings it back to the idea that how we think about the world matters. Because it changes the way in which we feel and behave. In my opinion, this gives us some very exciting opportunities for how to help people who've got emotional difficulties. But I think it's also important for people who themselves are suffering, because rather than blaming them for their difficulties, it means that there are things that they can do themselves to get out of the problems that they find themselves in. It gives people a sense of agency and control over their own mental health.

Implications of a psychological model

As a practicing clinical psychologist, the point of doing research is to make a difference in practice. In this brief video, I explain some of the implications of the findings of our study - what it might imply for how we understand mental health problems, and why it might lead to a different way of delivering services.


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This video is from the free online course:

Psychology and Mental Health: Beyond Nature and Nurture

University of Liverpool

Get a taste of this course

Find out what this course is like by previewing some of the course steps before you join:

  • What makes us tick?
    What makes us tick?
    video

    Peter Kinderman introduces us to the nature vs nurture course and discusses what makes us tick

  • What does the brain actually do?
    What does the brain actually do?
    video

    In the videos and papers this week, we explore the role of biological factors in the development of mental health problems.

  • Life events and mental health
    Life events and mental health
    video

    Peter Kinderman discusses the role of life events and environmental factors in the development of mental health problems.

  • Doing things differently (perhaps...)
    Doing things differently (perhaps...)
    video

    This video introduces why Peter Kinderman suggests psychological science offers robust scientific models of mental health problems and well-being.

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