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A young person looking concerned.

Fear, uncertainty, and anxiety

Fear, uncertainty, and anxiety are bound to be heightened by the response to COVID-19.

This fear and anxiety can especially affect people already suffering from anxiety, and repeated news cycles about the spread of coronavirus do not help this anxiety.

Remember it’s okay not to be okay in these circumstances, this is normal.

Amidst the COVID-19 outbreak, everyday life has changed and will continue to change for most people for the foreseeable future. Children have undoubtedly struggled with significant adjustments to their routines (e.g., schools and childcare closures, social distancing, home confinement), which may interfere with their sense of structure, predictability, and security.

Seemingly endless news cycles may feel overwhelming, confusing and scary to a child or teen. Children typically possess lesser abilities to decipher and understand from the news, the extent of risk that a disease outbreak poses to them or to their loved ones and friends. This can create a sense of panic amongst children. This may be more challenging when a child/teen is already suffering from an anxiety disorder or predisposed to feeling more anxious in unusual or new situations.

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This article is from the free online course:

Anxiety in Children and Young People during COVID-19

UEA (University of East Anglia)