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Introduction to Week 3

In this video Hellen Dawo recaps the concepts explored in Week 2 and introduces climate finance.
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HELLEN DAWO: Earlier we looked at how cooperation by different governments sectors leads to improved solutions for climate adaptation. We also saw that an interdisciplinary approach to climate adaptation resulted in transformative solutions. This week, we will examine climate finance and how this is organised on global, regional, and national levels. As you can imagine, in order to develop and implement climate adaptation solutions, financial resources are needed. Let’s think back for a moment. Climate change effects are a result of the buildup of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. The excess greenhouse gases given of by energy sources, such as coal and oil, industrial processes that emit carbon, or operation of household products, such as old fridges. Unfortunately, this pollution continues to increase.
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By examining the globe, one can plot out which areas have produced what amount of greenhouse gases over the last decades. Funding for climate finance is organised roughly using the polluter pays principle from environmental law. The polluter pays principle states that the party responsible for producing pollution has to pay for the damage the pollution causes to the natural environment. Although this internationally recognised law was enacted to target polluting farms, we find that climate finance is organised in much the same way. The more developed countries are obligated to contribute significantly to the climate fund. There are two ways of defining climate finance. One definition is that climate finance is the financial resources devoted to addressing climate change globally.
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The second definition is that climate finance is the financial flows to developing countries to assist them in addressing climate change. It is argued that developing countries bear the heavier brunt of the effects of climate change due to their lack of financial resources to implement adaptation. However, studies also show that the funds to aid developing countries often have tested solutions in mind. This takes away from a chance for local communities to innovate and try financially riskier and untested solutions. What do you think? Do developed countries have a greater obligation to pay for global climate adaptation? Should developing countries pay too? And what should climate funds be used for? During this week, we will review the current status of global climate finance.
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We hope that as we do this, you will be able to develop an understanding of the importance of climate finance for climate adaptation governance. You will also be able to reflect on the questions I posed earlier from a place of information. Welcome to week three.

In this video Hellen Dawo recaps the concepts explored in Week 2 and introduces the topic of this week: climate finance.

Funding for climate finance is organised using the polluter pays principle. The polluter pays principle states that the party responsible for producing pollution has to pay for the damage the pollution causes to the natural environment.

In order to develop and implement climate adaptation solutions, financial resources are needed. Two definitions of climate finance are discussed:

  • the financial resources devoted to addressing climate change globally; and

  • the financial flows to developing countries to assist them in addressing climate change

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Making Climate Adaptation Happen: Governing Transformation Strategies for Climate Change

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