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Case study: antidepressants

Case Study 1: antidepressants
Cloud of words related to depression that make up the shape of a brain
© University of Birmingham

Clinical depression is a well-recognised human condition with a characteristic set of symptoms. There are a number of therapeutic approaches which can be considered; the choice of which is used will involve consideration of a number of factors beyond the scope of this course. However, one therapeutic option involves the patient taking one of a number of drugs.

By understanding the neurotransmission processes linked to depression, we can attempt to use this understanding for “good” by identifying drugs that may provide therapeutic benefit, although, of course, all drugs produce adverse effects, which can be significant in some individuals.

Look up the 3 drugs which have been used to treat depression given below, and find out:

a. The neurotransmitter(s) that they target

b. where they act in the neurotransmission process – you may want to go back to the videos covering drug action at synapses.

Drugs:

1. Citalopram

2. Amitriptyline

3. Moclobemide

© University of Birmingham
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