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Week 2 summary

A summary of week 2 of the course.
9.6
In this final week of the course, we have focused on the visual design of game characters. Firstly, we considered the importance of visual design principles, taking a lot of influence from graphic design. We heard professional insights from Gordon Brown and Ken Fee and discussed the importance of line, shape, silhouette, colour theory, and the definition of visual style. We then focused on anatomy and observation of life, which included discussion of human characteristics that can be identified in nature and then exaggerated for effect to create successful character designs. Abertay lectures Ryan Locke and Clare Brennan also spoke about their artistic and design practise. Finally, we heard from Abertay graduate and professional character artist, Erin Stevenson.
55.3
At the close of this week, there’s one final exercise to work on. Once again, I’ve provided a short reading list if you want to move beyond what we have covered here this week. Overall, I hope you have enjoyed this two week course on video game character design and that you’ve learned something new. If working in the games industry is something that interests you, then I also hope that this course provided a useful foundation for you as you go forward into future study. I look forward to speaking with some of you online using the course hashtag. Please follow me on Twitter if you’re interested in hearing more about game design.
In this final week of the course, we have focussed on the visual design of game characters.
Firstly, we considered the importance of visual design principles, taking a lot of influence from graphic design. We hear professional insights from Gordon Brown and Ken Fee, and discussed the importance of appreciating line, shape, silhouette, colour theory, and the definition of visual style.
We then focused more on anatomy and observation of life, which included discussion of human characteristics that can be identified in nature and exaggerated for effect to create successful character designs. Abertay lecturers Ryan Locke and Clare Brennan also spoke about their artistic and design practice. Finally we heard from Abertay graduate and professional character artist Danny Sweeney.
At the close of this week, there is one final exercise to work on, and discussion to join in on. Once again I’ve provided a short reading list if you want to move beyond what we have covered here this week.
Overall, I hope that you have enjoyed this two-week course on Video Game Character Design, and that you have learned something new. If working in the games industry is something that interests you, then I also hope that this course has provided a useful foundation for you as you go forward into future study. I look forward to speaking with some of you online, using the course hashtag. Please follow me on Twitter if you are interested in hearing more about game design.
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Video Game Design and Development: Video Game Character Design

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