Skip main navigation

Week 4 Summary

This Week you explored how to: reference credible sources in your academic writing correctly paraphrase information and process data to support your ideas, claims and generalisations, and to demonstrate your …

Avoiding plagiarism

Plagiarism refers to presenting someone else’s work as your own, either for publication or for coursework on an academic programme, without making it clear that the ideas or words come …

Linking ideas in academic writing

You can use different methods to link ideas in your academic writing but it’s essential to understand the grammar behind them. In this video Jonathan compares three sentences that have …

Patrick’s essay: paraphrasing

In this video Jonathan provides an example of how Patrick has used paraphrasing in his essay on food waste using a credible source; the European Commission (2011). Follow Jonathan as …

Techniques for paraphrasing

Here are some techniques to use when paraphrasing. Remember that these techniques should only be used once you have ensured you fully understood the text; do not try to paraphrase …

How to use direct quotations

An effective quotation will express your idea succinctly, and have an impact on the reader. There is a danger, however, in using too many quotations within your work without careful …

Summarising, paraphrasing and direct quotations

There are three main ways in which you can integrate information or ideas from other sources into your writing: direct quotation paraphrasing summarising. Read this extract from “Utility Privatisation in …

How to paraphrase

When you paraphrase, you rephrase a specific sentence or set of sentences in your own words. It is important to show that you have understood your reading. Here is a …

Patrick’s essay: sources

Acknowledging your sources is an essential aspect of academic writing. In this video, follow Jonathan as he examines the three sources of information Patrick refers to within his essay to …

Why do we include references?

In academic writing, claims made by the writer should, as far as possible, be supported by evidence. This evidence must come from credible sources eg academic journals or authoritative institutions …

Learning language from reading texts

This is the first paragraph of the introduction in “Utility Privatisation in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Case Study of Water, Kate Bayliss, The Journal of Modern African Studies, Vol. 41, No. …

Week 3 Summary

This Week you looked at the principles behind paragraphing and examined the three component elements: the paragraph leader supporting sentences concluding sentence. You also looked at the different ways you …

Developing a paragraph

As you have seen in the previous Step, a paragraph can be developed in different ways. 1. Chronological development In the example below, an issue is examined in chronological sequence, …

Summary nouns

A summary noun summarises an idea which has been expressed earlier in a paragraph; either within the same sentence or in a previous sentence. Here are some examples from the …

Using a dictionary

Using a dictionary effectively is crucial not only in language learning in general, but specifically in checking or improving your academic writing. If you use a dictionary regularly it can …