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Conclusion for the Course

So far we have examined recent global economic and security changes in the wake of US shale gas revolution. Particular attention was given to energy industry, energy market, and energy …

Summary of Week 6

The early 2020s could be a very competitive period for LNG supplies to Asia. Russia possesses the potential to produce significant gas from its Eastern Siberia and the Far East. …

Expansion of Panama Canal

The expanded Panama Canal allows very large crude carriers (VLCC) to carry oil from the US Gulf Coast to Asia, at a much lower cost and reduced time than before. …

Canadian LNG projects

There is no clear timeline for when Canada might start to export LNG of its own. Canada has 20 proposed projects, a few of which have permits in place, but …

Australian LNG

Australia is another contender for the Asian LNG market. It is geographically closer to Asia than is the US. But Australian LNG needs firmer, long-term contracts to keep its “greenfield” …

US LNG exports

After years of preparation, Cheniere Energy Partners completed loading its first tanker with liquefied natural gas for export at a Louisiana terminal on February 24, 2016.

Sea lanes of communications

Most of Asian energy consumption depends on the Middle East region and certain marine transport routes linking Asia and the Middle East. Such existing marine routes have traditional security problems …

New Asian energy security challenges

In Asia, Russia was expected to compete with the Middle East, North Africa, and Latin America as the provider of same-grade crude oil, and with the US, in particular, regarding …

Asian energy security

China, Korea, and Japan are the world’s largest economies. Energy supplies from the Middle East, and from the Gulf in particular, remain critically important. Both Japan and South Korea perceive …

Russian exports to Asia

Russia produces 10 million barrels of crude oil and about 600 BCM of natural gas. It exports about 200 BCM of the gas. The resources of Asiatic Russia and the …

Summary of Week 5

During the Cold War period, Soviet natural gas supply to Western Europe was stable even as US-Soviet tensions were high. In the 1990s-2000s, the European Commission pushed for the liberalization …

How can EU reduce dependence on Russia?

EU’s gas market liberalization The deregulation of the gas market will obviously impact Gazprom. It is the largest supplier and its gas crosses many transit countries to reach its customers. …

Can EU reduce dependence on Russia?

There is limited scope for significantly reducing overall European dependence on Russian gas before the mid-2020s (Dickel et. al., p. 1). European conventional gas production is expected to fall by …

How can Russia maintain gas exports to EU?

Europe’s demand problems From a Russian export perspective Europe’s demand decline has been offset by problems with North African gas exports and by the diversion of LNG to Asia following …

Threats to Russian gas exports

Gazprom’s sales to Europe have been relatively stagnant, and indeed declined sharply in 2014 for the following reasons. Demand decline Overall European gas consumption fell from 577bcm in 2008 to …