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This content is taken from the EIT Food, University of Reading & European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT)'s online course, Food and Nutrition: The Truth Behind Food Headlines. Join the course to learn more.

Finding the source

If you want to find out about the credibility of a news article, we’ll provide a much more detailed assessment tool in the next Step but let’s first start with four questions you can ask yourself when you’re reading an article quickly.

  1. Does the article clearly states who the author is?
  2. Is it possible to check their credentials?
  3. Does the article link to the original scientific paper it is based on?
  4. Can you access it easily?

Is there a link to the original study? A link to the scientific study can help us judge the quality of the science behind. A link to the scientific study can help us judge the quality of the science behind the headlines. If an article doesn't cite any scientific studies, it can be hard to tell if claims are backed up by evidence.

Task

Why not find an online article and ask yourself these quick questions. Share the link to the article and your thoughts in the discussion below. Remember in the next Step, we’ll be providing you with a much more in-depth assessment tool to check credibility.

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This article is from the free online course:

Food and Nutrition: The Truth Behind Food Headlines

EIT Food