Skip to 0 minutes and 7 secondsDR MAYANK PATEL: Hello. I'm Doctor Mayank Patel from University Hospital Southampton, here in England.

Skip to 0 minutes and 12 secondsDR NICOLA ENGLYST: And I'm Dr. Nicola Englyst. I'm an associate professor at the University of Southampton and I'm also the MSc Diabetes Best Practise programme lead. Now Mayank, can you tell me what it is about insulin that we need to know more about?

Skip to 0 minutes and 29 secondsDR MAYANK PATEL: Every day, around the world, lots of people use insulin as a treatment for their diabetes. Perhaps you are one of those people. You may even know somebody, a family member or a friend, who uses insulin as part of their treatment for diabetes. You may even be a healthcare professional looking after somebody with diabetes. It's very clear from my work as a diabetes specialist that there are patients and people who do not know how insulin works and therefore don't get the most from it. Its most common use is in managing diabetes, as insulin helps to lower blood sugar levels.

Skip to 1 minute and 8 secondsWorking as a diabetes specialist, I frequently encounter situations where fellow health care professionals do not understand how insulin works. As a result of that, there are patients who have come to harm and sadly in England have died through errors and neglect when using insulin. With all of these things in mind, I have worked with my colleagues at the Faculty of Medicine at University of Southampton to create this course All Things Insulin. We've endeavoured to produce a learning course where all information about insulin can be conveniently found in one place. We cover how insulin works, its physiology and biochemistry, through to it's use clinically to help people control their diabetes.

Skip to 1 minute and 54 secondsWe sincerely hope you find this course useful and share the learnings widely. Thank you.

What is the risk of not knowing enough about insulin?

Insulin is an essential diabetes medication, yet errors in prescribing and administering insulin occur frequently and can result in hypoglycaemia and even death.

Improving knowledge of healthcare professionals, people with diabetes and their carers will improve insulin safe use.

In this short video, lead educators Dr Mayank Patel and Dr Nicola Englyst explain why we’ve created a course that brings together ‘all things insulin’ into one place.

Join the conversation by sharing your response to the following question. You can do this by posting in the discussion area below. Rather than on this step, we encourage you to introduce yourself in step 1.3 where we’d also like you to share with fellow learners where you are in the world on our learner location map, and what has motivated you to join the course.

What do you think is the risk of not knowing enough about insulin?


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This video is from the free online course:

Understanding Insulin

University of Southampton