Adam Kosa

Adam Kosa

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  • As for English monolingual dictionaries, I would recommend The Free Dictionary, which I think one of the freely accessible dictionary out there. It also has French and Spanish, and some specialised dictionaries in medicine, finance and legal. It is based on the American Heritage Dictionary so it is better for American English than British English. For British...

  • It might also depends on when was the book translated. I am not sure about German market, but In Hungarian, it was a common practice in the are of Cold War to localise proper names in novels, which sometimes has some interesting or humorous results.

  • I am wondering how much the word evokes military context. In Hungarian, which is my native language, we have the word "bajtársiasság", which literally means "partnership in trouble, difficulties or danger". Strongly has military connotations, but I found that it also express loyalty, a certain sentiment between those men, who experience any kind of hardship....

  • For your question, linguistically speaking, Gaelic or Irish is a branch of Celtic language family. Other Celtic languages, for example, are Welsh, Scottish Gaelic, Cornish.

  • I am not an expert on the topic, but I did some quick research on the topic, and it turns out, in the case of Africa, we might better speak of lingua francas, in plural. Although the language of the colonisers still have their position (Arabic, French, English), it seems that Swahili is aspiring to be a new lingua franca of the continent. Here is an article on...

  • You are welcome. :) I hope you will enjoy it.

  • One of the films I would recommend and watched is the A Translator. Here is a link about the movie:

    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt4488744/

  • @SandraF. , I also recommend trying out translating TED Talks, which , I think, a great place to start. They even have a mentor program now, where experienced translators guide new members and share their expertise. If you are interested, you can check out this link:

    https://www.ted.com/participate/translate

  • On a more practical level on the topic, I am starting to see more and more companies using MT systems to aid translation process, and I think it is inevitable that some of our translation solutions are affected by it, which can already be a certain type of adaptation to AI. If we extrapolate this idea and imagine a scenario where more people will read machine...

  • There are some very good points here, and obviously it would be difficult to see a direct connection in how etymologies of words affect our current thinking and approaches to certain issues. But the words we use certainly matter (otherwise we would not fight, or even kill each other, over words). And regarding translation, although it is true that each job...

  • @JacobLloyd As a Hungarian myself, I can confirm that. It was a great hit when I was in school (good times), but I did not know it had such a fame in the US, @DavidPeachey. Thanks for sharing it. Here is one song from the other side, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7tzpkSYYYYM , it is a Hungarian misheard lyrics of a Brazilian song, Ai Se Eu Te Pego. (I...

  • We cover more of the question of machine translation later in the fourth week, but certainly, this is one of the central issue in the field. For me, what is interesting is that we often think of the replacement of human translator and how we can train a machine to produce human-like language. But what if we look at the other side, and think of how humans can...

  • Hello everyone, my name is Adam, and I am one of the mentor who is helping you through the course. I am graduating this year from MA Translation Studies in Cardiff, UK. Currently, I am trying out myself as a freelancer specialising in audiovisual translation from English to Hungarian. I am really hope you will be enjoying the upcoming few weeks with us, and we...

  • Well said, Jill, I can completely agree with that. At the end of the day this is all matters, whether the audience are able to enjoy art to the fullest.

  • Adam Kosa replied to [Learner left FutureLearn]

    You are welcome, Anna. And thank you for the suggestion. I will forward it to the team, and see what we can do.

  • and what about Bollywood? Have you heard about it?

  • Thank you, Isequiel, we very much appreciate your contributions and enjoyed reading your comments too.

  • This gardening metaphor might be more common in some languages. In Hungarian, we use commonly the phrase 'átültetni', which means something like "replant" or "repot", when we talk about translations. I am wondering if other languages use similar expressions.

  • Do not worry! It is certainly not an easy task, and I think it might be a benchmark of a good text that if we think it is untranslatable, making us learning a whole language just to be able understand it.

  • I think our own biases are often not really our own but bias is inherently part of any mediation and language itself. A text in a neutral language would be a meaningless text. We often say translators should be faithful to the source text, but I do not think it is what they are faithful to. It is always something else. To their client, to their different...

  • Especially if you think that non verbal communication is not always universal. But yes, it is certainly a problematic and complex question.

  • But it was just an assumption, I do not have any evidence, but it is certainly deserves attention how the strive for quality can sometimes be overridden by the importance of social relations.

  • Exactly, @KarinMarty ! The Austro-Hungarian was, indeed, a real melting pot of cultures. And we got so isolated from our language relatives that many people still do not think that our language has anything to do with Finnish.

  • These are very interesting ideas, indeed. It makes me think how the technology used to mediate the translations and the translations themselves get intertwined, affecting the aesthetic experience. Could these technologies superimposed on the originals any way transform the originals themselves (or at least how we interpret them)? It is certainly different when...

  • Adam Kosa replied to [Learner left FutureLearn]

    Hi @Anna❤️ , There are several ways to go about it. Some translators or clients still use Excel sheets (this is usually called glossary) to record terms. Others may use Microsoft Access or other database management software. A database for terminology is called term base, and this is what is built into CAT tools. For example, SDL Trados Studio has the SDL...

  • And I would just add, that this might true for other languages, there is nothing unique about Hungarian, and one could think of a language as a patchwork of other languages, where translation might be the operation, in a sort of mangling fashion, that turns the different colours of the blocks in the patchwork into one colour, or make them less distinguishable.

  • I think the connections between languages can go far beyond language families. For example, @HelenGräwert , in the article you shared, it says Hungarian kept most of its etymons, but if one look at the language more closely, we can see much more diversity. In a more or less chronological order, there are Finno-Ugric, Old Turkic, Iranian, Ottoman Turkish,...

  • Hi Maya! We are too glad to have you here and hope you will be enjoying the course and find it useful. :)

  • You're welcome :) My country is Hungary (not mine though, I am from it).

    And relating to this whole issue, I was also thinking, but I do not have any evidence, that there could be some sort of corruption of commissioning these translations. At times, the translator's competence is less important, than their personal connections. In Hungary, a few years...

  • Thanks, @SergiyShklyar , the dictionaries you mentioned are indeed useful. I would just add a few other sources:

    https://leme.library.utoronto.ca/ - this is the Lexicons of Early Modern English, which is large database of different monolingual and bilingual dictionaries, glossaries, encyclopaedias etc. from 1475 to...

  • Brilliant idea! and indeed, it would be not without problems. I am just wondering, for example, would you do copy the painting as well or just take a photo of it?

  • @AdrianaRodriguezSantana , you made a good point of that how conveying meaning clashes with being neutral, and it can happen in many cases. As @QipengGao said, words themselves can express emotions (they are not really empty shells), and sometimes even the most detached and neutral speaking voice with a rightly chosen words can have the biggest emotional...

  • It is an brilliant parallel. If we think of the messenger similar to translators. Since both carrying messages different borders, and they make it possible to make a bridge between those who otherwise find it difficult or not possible to come in direct contact. It is especially interesting if we look at how translation itself often perceived as a message...

  • Thank you for the recommendation, Anna. This certainly sounds something worth to watch for those interested in the issue.

  • Not too bad, Linda. Translating a poem from the 17th century is never easy. For the expression "jiggled a hossy" others tried to give some solutions, but you can try to figure it out from the context. But I will give a hint. Many of us think that "hossy" means something like "horse", probably from the phonetic resemblance. The other thing is the word "horse"...

  • The part about personal opinion and political affiliations reminds me of a well-spread image of a translator as a machine or as a conduit or a "slave on another man's plantation", to bring in the metaphor we already learnt. I am wondering if in your context, is it always apply? Is there any examples of transgression of this part of the code of conduct?

  • Well, it is certainly depends, again, how we see translation. So far, we look at it as a professional activity, but we can also see it as a phenomenon that is part of our everyday lives. This is why the translation diary, for example. The viewpoint might lead to further questions of, for example, what does it mean to have a good linguistic and cultural...

  • You can call me Adam :) you are welcome, and we, too, very much appreciate your contributions.

  • Thanks, Helen. I think this low quality translations is partly tied to what you just said about locality. Even though, we might think of web as a borderless space, it is still linked to the physical space from where the user access to it or what the actual page ownership is. Translation most of the time works as transporting language from its own locality to...

  • "Jiggled a hossy" might mean "steal a horse" as Helen earlier mentioned, which can be true if you look at the context, but of course, in translation, it can be anything that makes sense in the target text.

  • Thanks, Helen. These are highly valid points. Translation and space will be relevant our discussion in the upcoming weeks. And just out of curiosity, do you happen to haven some examples for this low quality translations?

  • Thanks, José. Nevertheless it is always interesting to see languages other than English :)