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A midwife’s personal story

We would now like to share with you a powerful, real-life account of one woman. Her experience will resonate with survivors across the world: the relentless juggling of the abuse …

Why we are offering this course?

Domestic violence and abuse (DVA) knows no boundaries, not in relation to who it targets, when it strikes or how. It may commence or escalate during pregnancy, when not just …

Making the referral

Part of the response to DVA disclosure is to offer referral and follow-up. The person’s unique circumstances will dictate your referral response. On the one hand, you may be offering …

This week

Last week’s education focused on domestic violence and abuse (DVA) from the perspective of the childbearing person and their families. This week we will seek to enhance our screening practices …

Risk factors

Certain factors are associated with increased or decreased risk of domestic violence and abuse. However, it is vital for health providers to recognise that DVA knows no boundaries and can …

Trust and relationships

Building a trusting and personalised relationship facilitates the screening process (Burnett & Bacchus, 2016; Mauri et al., 2015). Another minimum condition for healthcare providers to ask women about DVA is …

Documentation

Healthcare providers should accurately and completely document the findings of any examinations and any other information relevant to domestic abuse. This allows appropriate follow-up and supports survivors to access advocacy, …

Arranging follow-up

One of the strengths of the antenatal care setting for addressing domestic abuse is that people will (or should) return several times over the course of the pregnancy. However, it …