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Predicting future and simple future

One of the most rewarding ways of getting learners to produce language – their own, or another target language – is to create a mystery, enigma or cliff hanger in …

Narrative and story building

In the previous two steps, we looked at how sequencing shots and filling in ellipses might encourage language production. In this step we take things a little further and discuss …

Narrating – teaching ideas

Film is an unusual medium because it is quite ‘present’ in form – it feels as though it is happening directly before our eyes. At the same time, film stories …

Shots in sequence

Earlier on in the week, in Step 3.3, we looked at timelines, editing, and their relationship to tenses in language. In this step we’re going to look at how altering …

Ellipsis – teaching ideas

The principal technique used by works of art is that of withholding information. Withhold too much information, and the work is opaque, obscure or obtuse, and difficult to follow. Give …

Recount – teaching idea

In this step we’d like you to complete a more extended recount task. The video above is the complete version of the one whose beginning we showed in Week 2. …

Recounting and past tenses

The written or spoken equivalent of the film flashback is the ‘recount’. This is where we recall a set of events, sometimes in a sequence. Diaries are the most common …

Flashbacks and the past tense

The flashback is a technique in film that is unique to the medium; in fact there is some speculation that the notion of the flashback in human psychology – as …

The timeline

In filmmaking, the editing process is central to ‘how meaning is made’. Editing is where we decide how to sequence our shots; how long to make them, and how we …

The five types of film time

When studying film, there is an important distinction to be made between two dimensions of ‘story time’: the time we experience as the viewers of the film (the 2 hours …

Next steps

So that concludes the Short Film in Language Teaching course. We hope that you’ve enjoyed it and have benefited from contributing to discussions and sharing best practice with your peers. …

Dialogue and non-verbal communication

Throughout Week 2, we’ve been looking at how film is very useful in supporting our inferences of what characters are saying. Perhaps the most valuable cues come from people’s facial …

Developing film language

Teachers who took part in the BFI’s Screening Languages project found that one of the ways of intriguing and engaging young people with a new language was to help them …

Dress and stereotypes

Dress is one of the signals, or codes, that filmmakers and other visual artists use to communicate ideas about people, or groups of people and the cultures that they come …