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Revolution, War and Peace

Europe faces a terrifying threat to its established order as revolutionary France seeks to overthrow monarchs and build an empire. Inspired by radical politics, its vast armies — led by …

Your questions answered

In this final video (11 minutes) Chris and Karen answer three of the questions you asked – about the distribution of ‘prize money’ to the Allied troops that fought at …

Extended reading

If you would like to take your interest in this week’s topics further, the books listed below are recommended reading. For some of them, you will probably need access to …

Popular recognition and memorialisation

Although Wellington’s reputation was forever linked to Waterloo, his victories in the Peninsular War had already made him a household name. From 1810 onwards his likeness began to appear on …

The Wellington Arch

Built in 1825–7, the Wellington Arch at Hyde Park Corner, London, was intended as a victory arch to commemorate the British victories in the Napoleonic wars. Both the Wellington Arch …

Wellington: the Great Briton

The Duke of Wellington continued his military and political career after Napoleon’s defeat, and was Prime Minister between 1828 and 1830. Despite events that tarnished his reputation, when he died …

Philippoteaux’ The Battle of Waterloo

The Battle of Waterloo was to prove a popular subject for pictorial representation. Many paintings which used it as a subject were produced in the two or three decades after …

Achilles and the ladies of England

In the period after Waterloo, there were many proposals for monuments to the Duke of Wellington, most of which did not come to fruition. The nation’s gratitude to Wellington had …

Your questions answered

In this video (10 minutes) Chris answers four of the questions you asked – about the aftermath of the battle, Wellington’s role in the peace deliberations, the treatment of soldiers …

The arts and Waterloo

The victory at Waterloo was celebrated through the arts — especially painting and sculpture — and these works in turn have shaped our memory of the battle and its heroes.